Monthly Archives: September 2016

The Book Thief – Markus Zusak

Review (Amazon):  It is 1939. Nazi Germany. The country is holding its breath. Death has never been busier, and will become busier still.

Liesel Meminger is a foster girl living outside of Munich, who scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she encounters something she can’t resist–books. With the help of her accordion-playing foster father, she learns to read and shares her stolen books with her neighbors during bombing raids as well as with the Jewish man hidden in her basement.

In superbly crafted writing that burns with intensity, award-winning author Markus Zusak, author of I Am the Messenger, has given us one of the most enduring stories of our time.

My Review (Spoilers!):

Executive Summary: blah

This book has been on my To Read list for ages, but boy did it not live up to the expectations! A month after reading it (I’m getting caught up from my vacation!) and I can barely remember what the book was about or what the point was. I feel sometimes like you could set any book in Nazi Germany and it will somehow be a winner.

This book was far too long with characters that were so dull, you forgot about them before you even closed the book. Oh, and the narrator of the book? It’s death. Like grim reaper death. -_- I hated that.

The main character, Liesel Meminger, is 10 years old and lives with Hans and Rosa Hubermann. The Hubermanns have a few older (out of the house) children, and to make a little extra money, they agreed to take in Liesel. They were supposed to also take his brother but unfortunately he died on the trip to their house. Liesel and her mother bury her brother, and Liesel “steals” her first book–one she finds about grave digging. Liesel’s parents are communists so it’s not a safe time for them to live in Germany. Luckily Liesel has blonde hair and “looks German” so she can blend in. Her best friend is named Rudy, and he is a bit of a troublemaker. They play soccer in the streets and Liesel works hard to catch up in school.

Her father realizes that she is behind and also that she wants to be able to read her books so he has late night sessions with her to learn to read her books. Hans was a soldier in WW1 but he can’t seem to figure out where to stand on the Hitler movement despite his son being quite involved. Hans had a great friend in the war who was Jewish so he has a hard time prejudicing them.

Rosa helps out Hans’s painting jobs by doing laundry for some wealthy families in town. As times get tougher in Germany with the war efforts, she sends Liesel to drop off and collect the laundry assuming that people would be less able to cancel on a little girl. Liesel befriends the mayor’s wife who has a giant library. Ilsa gives Liesel books to read, including the journal which she writes her story (which Death is narrating), but eventually Ilsa has to stop her laundry service. This upsets Liesel who starts breaking into the library with Rudy’s help to “steal” books.

One day, a strange man shows up at the Hubermann’s and it turns out to be the son of Hans’s WW1 Jewish friend. The Hubermanns decide to shelter him in their basement where he and Liesel become great friends. She reads to him, and Max paints and writes stories for her.

The war progresses and the times to go to a bomb shelter become more frequent. The Hubermanns have to go to a neighbor’s as their own basement is not deep enough. While in the shelter, Liesel reads to the group of neighbors to keep their minds occupied. “Parades” of Jews are also brought through the town. It is during one of these that Hans makes a huge error and shows sympathy to one of the Jews. He knows then that he, and especially not Max, are no longer safe. Max leaves their house to find a different place to hide. Shortly thereafter, both Hans and Rudy’s father are drafted into the army. Hans ends up with a broken leg and is sent home.

One evening, Liesel is writing in her journal in the basement, and bombs strike her town leveling her house. For some miraculous reason (in her not-bomb-proof basement), she survives but neither the Hubermanns nor Rudy do. Ilsa picks her up from the officers and she then lives there. When Rudy’s father returns from the war, he also takes Liesel under his wing. Eventually once the war is over, Max returns and finds Liesel at Rudy’s father’s shop. This just seemed really awkward to me.

The book then ends with Liesel living in Australia with her husband, children and grandchildren, and finally Death finds her.

Verdict: 3 stars

I felt like this book could have been easily condensed to about 2/3 of the final product. There wasn’t anything particularly wrong with the book per se, but there also wasn’t anything about it that I was totally smitten about. I thought the characters were very vanilla which made me not care very much about them. It is rare that you read a story set in one of the worst wars in the history of humanity and you don’t really care whether the characters live or die. Or maybe you only care if they live because you don’t want to hear Death’s narration of them dying. I expected so much more based on everything I had heard about this book, and I came up sorely lacking.

 

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Filed under 3 stars, Book Review